The religious life as its own reward

|

Here is a quote from James McGrath's blog:

...it is worth asking theoretically, even if one hasn't been driven to ask such questions by one's own experiences or theological reflections, whether faith in God based on what God has done or can do for you is necessarily a wholesome, positive sort of faith. What if it turned out that God doesn't do anything for anyone specifically - the weather on your wedding day just happened to be good, and the person you love who recovered from an illness just happened to do so? What if it turns out that God is not the answer to our individual problems, but simply the meaning of our existence? How many of those who call themselves Christians would worship such a God for that reason alone, expecting nothing in return? Would willingness or unwillingness to worship such a God be a good thing? (emphasis added)

5 comments:

Jan said...

That "God is the meaning of our existence" says it all for me. I wish I could be with this all my life; am just moving towards this.

Matthew said...

>>whether faith in God based on what God has done or can do for you is necessarily a wholesome, positive sort of faith. <<

I've found that if you're looking through the eyes of self (which creates the world of 'what can be done for ME?'), you lose connection with Reality. It's a case of 'gain your life to lose it'.

Matthew

Frank said...

Appealing to God to fix problems in your life isn't exactly transcendent. Its more of a means to keep things the way they are or avoid suffering. Then again, I wouldn't rule petitions out as a good practice. They can be an initial step on the road to transcendence, and even good at every level of spiritual growth.

There is something about the meaning of Incarnation in there. God is not just the meaning of our existence, but also the . . . goal? destination? end-result? of our transcendence--?

Matthew said...

>>There is something about the meaning of Incarnation in there. God is not just the meaning of our existence, but also the . . . goal?<<

Frank, if we are connected with God, thus doing 'God's will', is there a 'goal' beyond that?

Matthew

.soulmate. said...

The journey is the destination